ITIL V3 vs ITIL 2011

Logically the ITIL 2011 is still ITIL V3; it is just refreshed with new updates to 2011. The latest version also comprises of the five lifecycle publications as in the previous version. There is no visual difference in the ITIL Foundation. But there have been some changes in various sections of the five publications.

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Changes to Service Strategy

The concepts within the publication have been clarified, without changing the overall message. The updated publication includes more practical guidance and more examples where relevant.

  • Strategy management for IT services, has been introduced as a new process in ITIL 2011. In the previous ITIL V3 (2007) version, strategic assessments and the development of the service strategy were performed under Service Portfolio Management. To support the IT Steering Group, the new ITIL role Service Strategy Manager has been introduced.
  • Service Portfolio Management has been re-focused to cover activities associated with managing the Service Portfolio, following the introduction of the Strategy Management process in ITIL 2011. Strategic assessments and the development of the service strategy were removed from the process. New outputs Service Charter and Service Model have been added.
  • Demand Management was a part of Capacity Management in ITIL V3. Since the latest guidance includes clarifications on the differences in scope between Demand and Capacity Management, a dedicated Demand Management process has been introduced as part of Service Strategy. The role Demand Manager has been introduced to perform the activities in the Demand Management process. The main output of the new Demand Management process is the Pattern of Business Activity (PBA).
  • Financial management for IT services uses the terms budgeting in ITIL 2011, accounting and charging instead of funding, accounting and chargeback.
  • Business relationship management is a new process in ITIL 2011. Some of the activities formerly undertaken by service level management are now done by business relationship management.

Business relationship management (BRM) activities will take place throughout the service lifecycle:

  • In service strategy, BRM will identify stakeholders, define the business outcomes, specify strategic requirements and funding, define the business case and validate the patterns of business activity.
  • In service design, BRM will validate the customer requirements, validate the patterns of business activity, confirm the costs and funding, ensure appropriate customer involvement in design activities.
  • In service transition, BRM will ensure appropriate customer involvement in transition activities, schedule customer involvement in training, validate release schedules, and be aware of known errors.
  • In service operation, BRM will communicate scheduled outages, provide updates on major incidents and act as an escalation point.
  • In continual service improvement, BRM will report on service performance, undertake customer satisfaction surveys and initiate service improvement plans.

Changes to Service Design

  • Design coordination is a new process in ITIL 2011. It has been introduced to coordinate all activities across all designs. The diagram below gives the key activities undertaken:

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  • Service catalogue management introduces the concept of having a “two view” service catalogue and a “three view” service catalogue. The “two view” is the same as in ITIL 2007 but the “three view” has two business views. The business views look at the services from an internal customer and external customer perspective. 

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  • Service Level Management has been completely redesigned in ITIL 2011 following the introduction of the Design Coordination process. Coordinating activities have been removed. Service Level Management is now mainly responsible for gathering service requirements, as well as monitoring and reporting with regards to agreed service levels.
  • Risk Management: No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011 in Risk Management.
  • Capacity Management:No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
    An new output Event Filtering and Correlation Rules has been added, to emphasize that (some) Event filtering and correlation rules should be designed by Capacity Management to support the detection of capacity issues.
  • Availability Management:No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
    An additional output Event Filtering and Correlation Rules has been added, to emphasize that (some) Event filtering and correlation rules should be designed by Availability Management to support the detection of availability issues.
  • IT Service Continuity Management:No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
  • Information Security Management:No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
    An additional output Event Filtering and Correlation Rules has been added, to emphasize that (some) Event filtering and correlation rules should be designed by Information Security Management to support the detection of security issues.
  • Compliance Management: No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
  • Architecture Management: No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011.
  • Supplier Management:No major differences between ITIL V3 (2007) and ITIL 2011 in Supplier Management. All suppliers and contracts are managed through the Supplier and Contract Management Information System (SCMIS), which in ITIL V3 was known as the “Supplier and Contract Database (SCD)”.

 

Changes to Service Transition

  • Change Management has been modified to highlight that significant Changes require authorization at different points in their lifecycle. New sub-processes have been added to assess Change Proposals and to implement minor Changes:
    • Assessment of Change Proposals
    • Minor Change Deployment

Change Management now submits major Changes to the Change Evaluation process for a formal assessment. Change Scheduling has been revised so that the detailed planning of a Change and the corresponding Release is performed by Release Management. Change Models have been given a more prominent role in Change Management, being used not only for Standard Changes (low-risk Changes on an operational level), but also for recurring significant Changes.

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  • Change Evaluation has been added, following a clarification in the ITIL books that the purpose of this process is the evaluation of major Changes. Change Evaluation is called upon by the Change Management process at various points in a Change’s lifecycle to perform a Change assessment. The results of a formal Change evaluation are documented in a Change Evaluation Report, which is thus the main output of the new Change Evaluation process.
  • Project Management (Transition Planning and Support) has been revised to highlight that its main responsibility is to coordinate the various service transition projects and resolve conflicts. Projects are initiated when Service Portfolio Management has chartered a new or substantially changed service. The Project Management process now calls upon other processes like Design Coordination and Release Planning to perform planning activities at a detailed level.
  • Application Development: No major differences between ITIL 2007 and ITIL 2011.
  • Release and Deployment Management is called upon from Project Management (Transition Planning and Support) in ITIL 2011 to perform the detailed planning of the Release build. Additional interfaces between Release Management and Project Management – Transition Planning and Support have been introduced to make sure that Project Management is constantly provided with current planning information. 

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Further guidance has been provided around the use of a change proposal.

  • Service Validation and Testing in ITIL 2011, additional interfaces between Service Validation & Testing and Project Management have been added to make sure that Project Management is constantly provided with current planning information. The ITIL V3 sub-process “Service Design Validation” has been removed as this activity now takes place as part of Change Evaluation.
  • Service Asset and Configuration Management inITIL 2011 requires additional interfaces in Service Asset and Configuration Management, in line with the new structure of Service Transition processes.
  • Knowledge Management: No major differences between ITIL 2007 and ITIL 2011.

Changes to Service Operation

The service operation processes have not changed significantly but rather contains further advice and guidance.

  • Event Management: Additional clarification has been given on event filtering and correlation to explain how basic events flow into the filters and correlation engines.
  • Incident Management: Further guidance provided on the interface between incident management and problem management.
  • Request Fulfilment: has been completely revised to reflect the latest guidance. Request Fulfilment now consists of five sub-processes, to provide a detailed description of all activities and decision points. Request Fulfilment now contains interfaces with Incident Management (if a Service Request turns out to be an Incident) and Service Transition (if fulfilling a Service Request requires the involvement of Change Management). A clearer explanation of the information that describes a Service Request and its life cycle has been added. The concept of Service Request Models is explained in more detail.
  • Access Management: An interface between Access Management and Event Management has been added, to emphasize that (some) Event filtering and correlation rules should be designed by Access Management to support the detection of unauthorized access to services. A dedicated activity has been added to revoke access rights if required, to make this point clearer. It has been made clearer in the Request Fulfilment and Incident Management processes that the requester’s authorization must be checked.
  • Problem Management: Further guidance provided on the proactive side of problem management. A new sub-process Proactive Problem Identification has been added to emphasize the importance of proactive Problem Management. In Problem Categorization and Prioritization, it has been made clearer that categorization and prioritization should be harmonized with the approach used in Incident Management, to facilitate matching between Incidents and Problems. The concept of recreating Problems during Problem Diagnosis and Resolution is now more prominent. Problem Diagnosis and Resolution has been completely revised to provide clearer guidance on how this process cooperates with Incident Management.
  • IT Operations Control: No major differences between ITIL 2007 and ITIL 2011.
  • Facilities Management: No major differences between ITIL 2007 and ITIL 2011.
  • Application Management is treated in ITIL as a “function”. It plays an important role in the management of applications and systems. Many Application Management activities are embedded in various ITIL processes – but not all Application Management activities. For this reason, at IT Process Maps we decided to introduce an Application Management process which contains the Application Management activities not covered in any other ITIL process.
  • Technical Management is treated in ITIL as a “function”. It plays an important role in the management of the IT infrastructure. Many Technical Management activities are embedded in various ITIL processes – but not all Technical Management activities. For this reason, at IT Process Maps we decided to introduce a Technical Management process which contains the Technical Management activities not covered in any other ITIL process.

 

Changes To Continual Service Improvement

  • The CSI Approach
    The CSI model has now been renamed the CSI approach with no changes to flow diagram.
  • The Seven-Step Improvement Process
    The Seven-Step Improvement Process has been clarified.

The process has now only seven steps:

Step 1 – Identify the strategy for improvement
Step 2 – Define what you will measure
Step 3 – Gather the data
Step 4 – Process the data
Step 5 – Analyse the information
Step 6 – Present and use the information
Step 7 – Implement improvement

Step 2 encompasses the 2 previous process steps; define what you should measure, define what you can measure.

 

References